Archive for the ‘Philosophy’ category

Quantum Mechanics, Consciousness, Penrose, and Spirit

September 1, 2016

[Reproduction of my reply to Neo’s blog post here. While not an attempt to unify theories and laws, it is pretty close to an ominibus of various concepts under my vision.]

It’s a minor leap from quantum computing to silicon computing. Although it looks large from an engineering stand point.

Physics, specifically quantum mechanics, and consciousness is linked by Schroedinger’s Cat type mechanics.

As for the human brain being too small, computer chips are the same size now as before, but they process faster and better due to better architecture, smaller nanometer construction, and better parallel processing. The brain is only half of what humans use to process information. Mastering the tool, isn’t something everyone can do, even when given the manual.

The difference between someone using one language to process a theoretical concept and someone using two languages in parallax and parallel to process the same theoretical concept, is much the same as the difference between a Pentium II chip and a latter generation quad core.

Silicon hardware has a heating issue. Biological wetware has an oxygen and blood toxin issue. Since most people aren’t even extracting the maximum oxygen from the air their lungs can draw out, there’s no way they can have their brains run even at 80% of natural capacity. The human body has balancing and safety measures, which includes not allowing muscles to constrict past 80% of their max force, absent adrenaline or other conditions. Often times the human brain is just set on “power save”, and that’s how most people go through their lives, after childhood. But again, the brain is merely half of the human processing power. The other half is in the second brain.

A lot of this connects to religions and atheism. Atheism cannot be based on faith, because it is supposed to use conscious rationalism to figure things out, using proof or some kind of concrete basis. But quantum mechanics and faith itself, are not concrete or even demonstrable. Much like the electromagnetic field, it is invisible, except for the effects.

As for God, it’s not hard to conceive of higher or lower dimensions in which entities exist that are not the same as biological humanoids or biological life on planets. Even human science fiction has figured this one out, for entertainment purposes.

The crucial difference is whether divine revelation is real, that a divine entity wants to have a person relationship, contract, or such with a human tribe, and if the recorded thoughts and feelings transmitted through corrupted (post Babel) language is accurate or not.

This separates people who are Deists or Agnostics, from people who believe in a particular divine revelation from a god or their god. Divine revelation is much like a family inheritance or a martial arts lineage, much of it must be qualified by its quality. If it isn’t real, then it doesn’t matter, except as a placebo effect on human behavior. If it is real, but not accurate, then we got more problems. If it is real, and also accurate, then there are even more problems.

While it would have been ludicrous to expect primitive humans back in the day to imagine how a higher level eneity could have created a planet or a solar system, humans right now can envision the power levels capable of such a feat. A Kardashev 2-3 type civilization could easily do so. Most humans think of such as another biological civilization or empire, because humans have to anthropomorphize things, like a higher entity, to make sense of it. That’s less of a limitation on the source of pure power, as it is a rendition of human flaws and limits.

It is precisely because higher level entities have a hard time relating to us, and that we have a hard time relating to them, that communication breaks down. Consider trying to have a meaningful contract, verbal spar, or negotiation with an ant. Crush an ant, throw water on a colony, or kick it out, and the ant merely recognizes you as part of the natural world. Your malice or other intent, doesn’t get through to them, because you don’t communicate in pheromones. Nor do the ant’s communications make sense to you, except due diligent reverse engineering using human reason.

The reason, if there needs to be a reason, for why people pray to God and they cannot magically affect the world, is pretty simple. Try being an ant and then telling a human not to step on it. Go ahead and try. It’s not impossible, but it’s not done in the usual method.

Without faith, the spiritual conduit cannot reach this earthly realm and affect change. This is why science cannot accept divine power, because divine power breaks the known laws of physics. Except for quantum mechanics which is already weird and has already forced a reconsideration of the nature of matter. Faith vis a vis Schroedinger’s Cat, would be never opening the box, then hoping some chance or element will bring out the desired result. Because if you try to “prove” whether the cat is dead or alive, you have now sealed that fate into the reality by collapsing the wave front via observation. Only by making sure it is a closed box, and observing it with faith only, can an outside force then affect the contents of that closed box, which they can open, if you don’t open it first.

As for why I speak of faith affecting miracles on Earth, it’s because there are plenty of unexplained things under the sun for the scientific methodology. Whether God is or not, whether the Bible is true or not, whether it even is accurate or not, doesn’t matter, since right now I have seen evidence where humans have called upon powers outside of themselves, in order to effect change. Now usually that would be called a “coincidence”, but not even I can accept that as the case, given what I’ve seen and researched.

Jean De Arc was merely one of the notable examples, there are plenty more from this and last century.

Also, a lot of atheists these days, aren’t atheists. They operate on faith, even if it is faith in a man made god or humanity itself or the scientific status quo. It’s still faith, they haven’t transcended and left us behind, while they operate 100% on reason and rationality. The same things people desire from a religion, atheists get it from their belief systems, it’s just not the same method, while having the same result.

As for proof, the microwave may be humanity’s proof that their theory of the atom was right… after a few renditions and system overhauls. But the proof why God works is more subtle, since God is managing the entire planet and the entire human race. So unless a person understands all of humanity’s good and evil, all of its flaws and fruits, that person cannot even hope to understand whether the system is working or not. They could compare Christian nations to Islamic nations, but that would be a superficial, political comparison. Divine level entities care about spirits and divine level powers. Human power politics is far beneath them, merely a bug in the “debugging”.

“Why” divine level entities would be interested in affairs on a planet (which they could easily create if they wished) is the unanswered question. Although actually, it’s more like a question everyone thinks they know the answer to, just as scientists thought they knew how the world worked back when the theory of atom involved no protons and no neutrons. They certainly did know how the world worked… to the limit of their mortal comprehension at least. And yet as primitive as they were to us, those 2000-4000 years ago, are even more primitive to the early physicists. And as the progression appears, imagine what a divine level entity, which is more intelligent than every single human that has ever lived, combined together, operates at.

Genesis speaks of God creating the Earth, the waters, and the system in 6 days. Joseph Smith from the 1830s, added that this was a simulation. Smith also added in certain parts to Genesis, which I felt was left out. Such as exactly what was meant by “days”. It’s not earthly days, because the earth didn’t exist yet and it wasn’t even spinning on the current axial tilt. So whose days was it, that Abraham was thinking of? The people back then couldn’t count to 360 easily, they had to use the degrees of star gazing to figure out the years, months, and days. They would use sun dial geometries to measure the degrees of divergence as stars and planets moved in the heavens, calculating the seasons and thus the days, in a 360 degree arc, and thus in 360 days. These were measured purely in triangles.

A god or a divine level entity, that exists purely as spirit and not in this realm at all like a hyper volume, trying to explain stellar mechanics to Abraham? There would be certain things they could not leave out, since the explanation would have to be very basic. Those explanations are missing in Genesis itself. Either it didn’t happen, which calls into question whether Abraham was really talking to a superior entity, or it happened and nobody bothered to write it down. Or they did write it down but nobody could then understand it using human language, so people forgot about it, like the telephone game.

Japanese view of gender equality

July 4, 2016

A couple of interesting topics such as military training women, the specific roles available to the sex/gender, and questioning Christianity vs Budo and equality vs special roles.

Economic Equality vs Power Equality

October 11, 2015
Courtesy Texan99
One of the reasons why Northern Abolitionists thought slavery was horrible under the Democrat plantation is because it made the South poorer and disenfranchised white workers as well.

The South lacked any real industrial power because slave labor was undercutting white workers, while aggregating wealth under white land owners. In the North, people had to be paid, so it made more sense to make factories and other jobs that were highly productive on a per manpower basis. In a feudal system, the Industrial Revolution would never happen, because serfs wouldn’t be allowed the freedom to just move anywhere and work in any city, for any wage.

Slave was becoming dangerous not merely to the blacks, white people may not necessarily care about black strangers and their families, but because it was going to start affecting white workers, normal American families that had “equal” rights.

Some people even recognized that ahead of time, such as General Lee, but they weren’t given any power to reform the system. The system didn’t want to be changed and all the land owners in power, had the power to punish and destroy anybody that thought different. A few KKK episodes, a little bit of canning here and there, and nobody would be left to contest the issue. Even poor whites and normal middle American families had to obey Jim Crow or else be punished. The State’s Rights to tyrannize their own people, even without the Black Question being involved.

The author perceives power dynamics as being above and directly connected to economic dynamics. Most people don’t really think of it like that. They think technology will end slavery sooner or later, that it is inevitable. That economics will naturally balance out the power scale. They think if some top law makes the wages better or introduces a better way of doing things, that this naturally makes things more productive or more fair for everyone involved.

From what I’ve seen of human nature, that’s a little bit too idealistic.

The Left’s moral reasoning or lack of

January 25, 2015

He’s been working on dealing with and describing the Left, in some ways longer than I have.

That he comes to a similar, yet slightly different interpretation, is what interests me. His philosophical writing reminds me of other philosophers such as Ayn Rand.

This is another great example of what happens when people try to use logic or reason against Leftists.

Reviewing the movies of Akira Kurosawa

October 8, 2014

After the Rain made quite an impression on me. After I watched some other Japanese movies, I didn’t get the same feeling so I did some research to find out why.

The war now ended, Kurosawa, absorbing the democratic ideals of the Occupation, sought to make films that would establish a new respect towards the individual and the self. The first such film, No Regrets for Our Youth (1946), inspired by both the 1933 Takigawa incident and the Hotsumi Ozaki wartime spy case, criticized Japan’s prewar regime for its political oppression.


Kurosawa’s is a heroic cinema, a series of dramas (mostly) concerned with the deeds and fates of larger-than-life heroes. Stephen Prince has identified the emergence of the unique Kurosawa protagonist with the immediate post-World War II period. The goal of the American Occupation to replace Japanese feudalism with individualism coincided with the director’s artistic and social agenda: “Kurosawa welcomed the changed political climate and sought to fashion his own mature cinematic voice.”[204] The Japanese critic Tadao Sato concurs: “With defeat in World War II, many Japanese … were dumbfounded to find that the government had lied to them and was neither just nor dependable. During this uncertain time Akira Kurosawa, in a series of first-rate films, sustained the people by his consistent assertion that the meaning of life is not dictated by the nation but something each individual should discover for himself through suffering.”[205] The filmmaker himself remarked that, during this period, “I felt that without the establishment of the self as a positive value there could be no freedom and no democracy.”

I wondered why so many Americans liked the Seven Samurai movie. As well as why some Japanese like Wild West Westerners from the US.

The idea of the individual hero fighting for or against society, however, does explain many things. After all, it’s something I myself came to a similar conclusion on after a voyage on learning about evil.

Japan is still a nation moved by group politics and social consensus or social Will, but it still has a great amount of individual will in certain sub cultures and entertainment venues. Far more than is the case in America herself these days. It’s somewhat reversed. In America, our Hollywood entertainment, education, police, and political circles are all corrupted for one reason or another, leaving only certain types of groups (gun owners) to have the requisite experience and virtue to act as individuals. Everyone else is too afraid of their Boos or Social Authority to disobey. In Japan, individual private ownership and will can be seen in the otaku culture as well as Japan’s educational corporations and schools, but submit to the security of the group via the Japanese Defense forces and the local police units. In America, we rely on personal arms and other warrior esque training to protect ourselves, our families, or our communities. The police doesn’t really do much except clean up the bodies. Even the deadly Marathon bombings a few years ago were stopped by a citizen that escaped his captivity at the hands of Islamic terrorists inside the US and reported the location and vehicle type of his captors, resulting in their death/capture. Meanwhile the police were shutting down entire city sectors and finding nobody useful.

So I don’t think Kurosawa failed. To him, living in a Japan ruled mostly by social rules or authority laws, it might seem that nothing much changed. To an American that can tell the difference between individual strength/freedom and social obedience, Japan didn’t turn out too bad. Certainly when compared to China or modern US culture. With patriots like Kurosawa working to improve their culture and people, there’s always life and thus hope for improvement.

The problem is always when evil manifests and works against life. Then evil must be killed. Who is going to do it when American generations can’t even defend their own pathetic lives against murderers and serial killers?

You can read more about this on those links. After the Rain brought to me a lot of the individual heroic qualities I saw in Seven Samurai. So I’m just going to view all of them, if I can.

Trusting in Authority

January 18, 2014

I noticed a certain phenomenon in martial arts years ago. It was the issue of the difficulties with mastering an art or a class of techniques, based upon work load, time investment, and dedication over the years.

Many people who jump around the martial art schools, getting a black belt here or there, think they have mastered something. When in fact they have barely graduated apprenticeship school. They are still at the level where they are copying the instructor’s moves and can’t fight without the instructor telling them in their ear what to do and why. I often think that these individuals won’t have their instructor telling them what to do, when they actually come up against a threat in life accidentally or surprisingly.

To begin with, a black belt or shodan is a first degree black belt generally speaking. Every franchise school, every individually owned school, and every bloodline artistic style has their own determination of what makes a person promotable to a certain rank. There’s no E-5 or O-2 category that harmonizes the differences in ranks. The franchise setups like ATF attempt to do so, but quality control is wild.

What this translates to simulation time and competence is that mastery generally occurs around 10,000 man hours of practice/experience in something. A shodan is generally awarded to most modern karate students at around the 500-1000 man hour mark, and that’s not considering the quality of the simulation time. Given that 1 year on the battlefield equaled about 10 years training in the dojo.

Even though (some of) these arts and techniques should have been passed down unbroken and inherited by the instructors, it is incredibly difficult to get a student to proficiency and it’s impossible to get them to mastery since that requires independent thought.

Other than the DNA heir that inherits the techniques through his body, the rest of us have to supply hard work and our own experience to the dojo floor. It’s not something we inherit.

It’s more like something I backwards engineer and de-construct to reconstruct it in my own fashion.

A lot of the practical problems with using complicated hand to hand techniques is that people can “learn” or memorize a list of things to do. But they then won’t do it in a battle because they are still waiting for someone to tell them what to do, like they always did in the dojo. They’re always sitting at the feet of the masters listening to the stuff that is dropped unto them, to the point where they stop thinking for themselves. As a result, their combat effectiveness drops, even though some of them have had 10 or 20 or even 30 years of continuous training. Not 30 years of simulation time. 2-4 hours a week perhaps. Maybe 5-10 hours a week for serious hobbyists?

Even if we use a optimistic estimate of 5 hours of practice per day for the serious student, that’s only 1460 hours per year. Because of the lack of battle experience or fighting experience, even after 10 years people are still having problems thinking on their own, as their training time is not as effective as ancient methods that presumed students had at least some real world experience with violence. Many of those hours are spent in repetition training, where the brain just turns off due to following a habit. Good for obeying orders, not so good for figuring things out at a higher level. So 1500 hours per year, after 10 years you should certainly be proficient but only beginning, perhaps, the road to mastery.

It may be necessary for people who are new to be given a rigid format to learn from. But it should not be applied past its expiration date. People should not be using the same formal methods of learning via lecture and absorbing the words of the instructor, in their 10th year in a school. But because they never have to use this stuff for real or never have to test it out, people do sit around for 10, 20, 30 years and their fighting potential is still incomplete and often insufficient.

For martial arts, that’s just a hobby many Westerners take up given modern times. At most, they can only get themselves and anyone around them killed as a result of overestimating their knowledge and abilities. For politics, the economy, and military practices, the stakes are slightly higher and the consequences slightly more painful for the rest of us. Slightly, as in way more than should be reasonable.

But we’re overlooking how that can be a good thing.-Nick

Those who abdicate their judgment to others, can no longer complain about it afterwards. What are they going to say, that they didn’t “know what was going on”, that they were just doing as they were told to get by? That level of ignorance can only go so far, as consequences for a nation’s actions do blowback after awhile.

There’s a certain domestic sentiment in Europe and Japan, that says since America is paying for security we might as well rely on them to be the world’s police as they pay in gold and blood for our safety. But that means if America wants something, it’s hard to deny America what the hyperpower demands. That may be tolerable if people’s interests are in common, but what if Obama demands that a nation disarm and allow itself to be invaded and burned to ash so that Obama can sit and watch it on tv with Michelle for joys and giggles? Are people going to resist American power after decades of relying on American security guarantees and promises? Of course not; it certainly won’t be easy even if they try.

Europe has been stuck on that kind of parasitism for so long they have rotten. And Japan is only beginning to introduce counter-propaganda to counter the domestic concept that it is perfectly okay to rely on a foreign power, America, for most things in life. Israel has already been forced away from the American sphere, because of you know who. They had to go on their own way whether they liked it or not, because America is not always going to be there to protect people. And relying on such a power, abdicating one’s national interest in favor of somebody else’s guarantees, isn’t sustainable. It doesn’t produce independent individuals and it doesn’t produce strong nations.

The peace, prosperity, and security America offers is like a drug. People can become addicted to it. It’s like charity. First time they are grateful. Second time they are expectant. Third time they feel entitled to even more of your charity. Not only does this apply to foreign nations and their people, but it also applies to our own blacks, Jews, gays, lesbians, Democrats, and Republicans. Peace that they do not pay for, security that they do not bleed for, they will throw that stuff away as fast as someone promises them an even better deal. They know not the value of what people worked and died for, because it’s not in their experience/value system. They inherited the money, but not the virtues.


Just a little comment I wrote in reply to this post.

Independence of Will in Martial Arts

December 27, 2013

A lot of this applies to martial arts, at least at the higher levels of cognitive development. You don’t necessarily need independence of will, creativity, or free will to improve your physical conditions. You just do what you are told and you can grow stronger, faster.


I see the world in my own conceptual framework, of the contest between yin and yang or what I would like to call Individual free will and Authoritarian power.

A single human or person attempts to develop a sense of self identity and an ability to exercise free will, around puberty. Before that period, there’s little to no instinct to want to make decisions or judgments yourself, as your cognitive development is solid but still perfectly capable of accepting authority as the determination of your reality and ethics (Santa’s metaphysical reality for example).

In order to distinguish yourself from other people, so that you can distinguish your own will from what other people tell you to do, generally people try to find a subject matter that they have knowledge on or special expertise in. This is reinforced when society praises the individual for attempting to master a complicated and productive field. If society does not praise but instead condemns, then you get what might be called “sub-cultures”. It’s still obedience to societal norms and thoughts (because people are not yet free), but it’s obedience to a society of people like yourself: a sub culture.

Until a person is able to accept themselves, trying to get society to accept them may or may not work. Creative people or those with a burning internal desire for something, have to not only create a self contained identity that is able to control and make use of these burning desires but must also cooperate or adhere to community standards to function as a normal human being (herd or pack).

Many people have found success by finding a societal niche or role where they can put their energies to creative and productive use. So they benefit not only personally by having an outlet for their drives, but also recognition from society for being a productive member.

However, that’s not always the case. There are many individuals exercising free will or dissidents, where the state or high authority does not accept the existence of. If you say something you shouldn’t against Hussein or North Korea’s leadership, you may not find yourself as warmly accepted as a “creative thinker” as you might in the United States of America. That’s because it is not in the interests of authority to cultivate competition or rebels. The American system allows leaders and authorities to make bank on cultivating products and services, but that is only in the sense that they are tending livestock. It is not a system that makes you have free will. It just assumes you do have free will and lets you use it without dropping you into the river with concrete attached to your legs.

A popular phrase that might provide for easy visualization is: the nail that stands out is hammered flat.


Martial arts has its own unique combination of authority, authoritarian views, community standards (black belts), and individual will (technique deconstruction, construction, philosophy, and teaching).

Question your teacher, to see whether you are doing what your teacher tells you to do or whether you are learning from the teacher and learning how to do things on your own by your own judgment. It’s not very complicated. But that very simplicity masks the utter difficulty in the task of learning how to be your own person, act on your own judgment, become your own authority.