Archive for the ‘violence’ category

Tactical Flashlights

October 5, 2015

For a non lethal tool that brings forth light, I can imagine quite a number of uses for it.

Wasn’t the exact one I tested but close enough, click the link there for an example of what it looks like and some features.

In older wars, the officers sometimes had a sabre in one hand and a pistol in the other, to cover all tactical ranges and potential encounters. They weren’t specialists fighting at the front, but they could keep themselves alive long enough to hold a line and give orders at least.

One of the issues with a full non lethal force kit is that you lack the ability to project any kind of force or deterrence over ranges longer than your leg or maximum dash/acceleration in 5s. Very good for low force scenarios such as airplanes where you aren’t allowed, for a number of reasons, to utilize maximum firepower. And lower force levels are easier to explain, legally speaking. An insufficient force level can break your tactics, leading to death, but a strategic failure to justify level of force used may also kill you, just more slowly. Society is the one that tends to get you, later on.

For a practical digest, consider the difference between a person trying to charge a mass murderer shooting civilians, vs someone doing a zig zag approach on the mass murderer using a tactical flashlight to jam out the enemy’s targeting and accuracy. Generally, even untrained shooters can shoot people coming straight at them or running straight away, assuming melee isn’t engaged and cover/concealment plays no part.

As a bonus, since we’re in the Age of Light or the Age of the Internet or the Age of Communications, here’s some youtube videos to show you how these things normally operate.

Have to find the strobe and zoom functions, since that’s what I need the flash light for. The one I tested could threw a light 1-2 houses over, at night, and focus light down to a hand sized grid box at that distance. Which means that diffused light won’t disable the vision targeting of people at that distance, but a focused light would.

I’m currently absorbing the reviews and what they say, because I haven’t done my research on tactical lights. I have done my research on high carbon steel blades and their alloy variations, however, so I get the general gist of the methodology. Btw, for someone used to the sturdiness of machine consistent 1060 steel or the flexibility of 1045, some “stainless steel bevel” or some “acrylic aluminum bevel” doesn’t sound all that sturdy as an impact tool. Although for people afraid of getting blood on themselves and in their wounds, I suppose it is better than using the fist or elbow.

The dates on these videos are pretty old, 2 years by now. With improvements in circuity, the led lights actually get better as a result.

This, I think, is very close in features to the one I tested.

And another one, the more expensive one.

I try to look at the feature comparison, rather than the lumens. The price point seems to be under 25 dollars for the cheap ones, 50 dollars for the mid range, and 90+ dollars for the high range.

LEO: Obey or Else

September 16, 2015

Some of us were more clear sighted than others who said that this was justified lethal force and now we’re better than Ferguson who riot over a single death.

Better? Not sure what to say about that. The slaves still think they are free.

US military H2H competitions

August 4, 2015

This reminds me of Japan, where they constantly create merit by making different factions and levels compete against each other… in public.

Firearms self defense myths

July 20, 2015

A lot of those in the list reminds me of martial arts or H2H training arguments. The primary reason why people think something can’t be done, that’s high level, is because:

1. They’re incompetent, they’ve never done it, so they think nobody else on the human plane of existence is better.

2. The experts that taught them were incompetent, see 1.

The training methodology to squeeze out high dexterity and accuracy in situations where the heart wants to beat at more than 180 per minute, is already known to mankind. The thing is, a lot of people don’t do it, they don’t obey the training guidelines, or they just plain refuse to believe it. Then later on, they take the “evidence” of 99% of the race “failing to do this” as the proof that it can never be done. Crabs in a bucket.

In a normal feudal society, the representation of the best would be determined in tournaments or life and death duels (Miyamoto Musashi). Our modern world, however, is too soft for that. So we argue and debate and try to out capitalize the competition. Sometimes that works, sometimes it doesn’t. Firearms at least have easy data to access and loads of practitioners, citizen or criminal, to source off of. H2H, however, is much more difficult to parse out. We’re not Hong Kong in the 1960s, with everyone fighting on the roof tops to test things. We’re certainly not at the Miyamoto Musashi level of muga shugyos (training pilgrimages).

Mentality of killers and psychopaths

July 14, 2015

Here’s something new, which most people won’t understand.

A higher level warrior in society was often someone who could flip the “switch”. Meaning, they weren’t pro social psychopaths or sociopaths. They didn’t have insufficiently developed emotional imagination and empathy. When they were normal, they were normal socially conditioned members of their society. But when a threat faces them, they can switch off their emotions, killing their emotions, and go to town on the enemy.

People who are abnormal, are the ones that flip the switch and then can’t turn it back off again. Then they are in trouble.

This is triggered via a state consciousness shift, similar to snipers or killers that don’t need an emotion to justify their killing. The machine mind. The Zone.

This is why martial artists and other socially conditioned denizens like citizen soldiers, aren’t the most dangerous. They may get to that point after some experience, but the most dangerous are the weapons in human form. The ones that turn off their social morality matrix, their conscience, or their empathy, in order to defend X by destroying Y.

A fundamental difference is that a normal person that flips off the switch, can feel guilt. The abnormal person or the dysfunctional person, doesn’t feel guilt. He doesn’t even know that he did anything wrong, since the brain processes used to imagine it are turned off 100% all the time. He’d have to consciously think about it to figure it out.

From one perspective, a warrior doesn’t need emotions other than as motivation. A warrior doesn’t need hearing. A warrior doesn’t need to see color. All of that is wasteful brain processes that take up time, bandwidth, and oxygen. Eliminate them, shut them all down, and divert all power to the physical senses, reaction speed, and balance mechanisms, to unleash a human body’s full 100% power, rather than the 90% most people are capped at.

Compared to a human maximizing their animal and lizard survival instincts, creating a monopoly of control and precision, training and human abstract knowledge is not in and of itself enough to best it. Combining life and death battlefield experiences with mental and physical maturation, education, abstract knowledge, creates an ideal warrior philosopher, such as Socrates or Miyamoto Musashi or Sun Tzu.

The psychopath that cannot learn to put themselves in the shoes of their prey, will not be as effective as the full human who can use empathy to predict and manipulate their prey. However, learning to empathize with targets you kill, generates inordinate mental stress and attacks against the conscience, guilt, when the attacker lacks proper justifications for their actions. Justifying it based on “I was only following orders” is not enough. is the context for this topic.

Close range brawling

July 12, 2015

A lot of very good precepts, which I had to work out on my own, is in there explained as a lecture or rhetoric.

Things like this are much akin to horse riding or other martial skills like marksmanship or swordmanship. Hearing it theoretically is very different from understanding it physically. There’s a lot of details in horse riding that even a book cannot fully capture. For swordmanship, they don’t usually talk about the methods used to sheathe a sword. But that’s one of the more immediate and fundamental problems one faces when wielding a sword or wearing one. The ancients didn’t talk much about this because it was easy and everyone knew that it was an issue. Everyone except us, that is, in the modern world.

So for this video, it is speaking of the very basics, using reason rather than form or rigid rules. Even still, without personal experience, it is difficult to grasp fully enough for one to apply it in training or battle.

If a military had the choice of spending 500,000 dollars and 50 man hours of work, would they use it on H2H combat training or marksmanship and weapons training? People tend to prioritize the more effective route, given limited resources. That’s because that is the route with the shortest distance to the target. Martial arts or ancient traditions are often curves or quantum mechanical shapes, used to get to a destination .What is the shortest travel distance between A and B on a globe, a straight line or a curve? It’s a curve, because the situation is not ideal. It would only be a straight line if you could burrow through that much crust. Martial arts is often times a detour, or a curve. And for others, it is a straight line. The straight line express we no longer have, since it requires experience of a particular kind of fighting range that is rare. Miyamoto Musashi could directly learn the art of the sword, by fighting duels to the death. For the rest of us, we might have to do a Columbus detour or a Magellan detour.

Chi gong in Zhan Zhuang

July 12, 2015

Courtesy of G6.


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