Fandoms (kingdoms) vs Corporate Hierarchies in lawsuits: Star Trek holders and Axanar in conflict

I wrote a comment in reply to this pov on the title subject, so I’ll archive it here as well.

http://www.paulgraham.com/re.html

I See BS is using a passive income milking technique, often seen in Triple A PC game title producers.

It’s the mainstream marketing method, that puts a lot of money in, to get a lot of money out, relying on the mainstream, the 51% of the market, to buy the product.

But that means the fans, the fanatics, are left out. The niche markets, are ignored. That is rather ironic, since it was the fans who maintained the culture around the universe, the fictional world, being sold for entertainment. The word of mouth value, of the brand, is priceless. It cannot be rated, if CBS tried to pay someone to advertise to that extent, CBS would go broke immediately.

In a Kickstarter, the fans are the investors, the people pushing the money to pay for the production. They are not merely the consumers who can be ignored, because the investors, stock owners, and directors of CBS have determined so.

The economic article covers the history in greater length. Content creators have higher priority in the world market these days, than passive income mainstream status quo powers that be. The mainstream large title holders can buy rights to whatever they want, because they can outbid other people, but they cannot enslave the creative imaginations of the human population. They cannot lay claim to what original content creators produce, merely because they “own a license”. That would be like claiming one owns the “right to fire” because you killed the inventors behind human made fire, and now claim that everyone who uses fire and who makes fire, is using your “property”. It’s the difference between 1830 Democrat slave barons and 1930 corporate employees. It’s a moral difference, not merely an economic one, nor a legal fiction.

If people who like Star Trek’s post scarcity dream of a human society built upon cooperation rather than competition, first they will have to demonstrate that de-centralized communities, fandoms, are more efficient and more competitive than the large conglomerates and corporations at large. That is ironic in one sense, but also fitting. If “ownership” and “property” is no longer necessary in Star Trek’s universe, what then is left for people to do? Find challenges to overcome and improve their own selves.

Of course it isn’t easy figuring out the solution that benefits everyone. It’s not meant to be easy. It wouldn’t be worth anything if it was easy. If it was easy, you could just have a CBS buy it out and it would now be a “franchise” you can consume, but it is not and it won’t be.

Japanese visual novels have been brought to the US market through liasion services, using Kickstarter and crowd funding. This is with a LANGUAGE and cultural barrier. With a distance barrier and enormous licensing issues with many different US or Japanese factions. Yet it was the “fans” that created the company, Sekai Project and others, and it was the fans that did the translation. They acquired “negotiation leverage” because they had demographic data and a significant amount of funding, to offer Japanese companies that are starving for money.

Entities like CBS only care about the money. Stockholder issues and CEO prestige. If the fans seem weak and gullible, CBS will extract an appropriate extortion fee every once in awhile, when they need the cash. If people wish for a more equitable relationship, they will have to bring some serious cash and leverage to the negotiations table. That’s how human society works, before it ever becomes post scarcity, post property. Fortunately for them, it has been done before, and it’s not like Star Trek communities lack the organizational infrastructure. They are merely… too beholden to the ideal of a property less ideal, that they probably don’t want to think about how to make money or exploit their own asset advantage (creating content). That’s why CBS doesn’t get it. They care only about the money and maybe their own ulterior motives. It’s not merely a lawyer problem, but also a cultural problem. Even if the factions speak the same language.

If you want a company that licenses and produces films by sub contracting out to fan organizations… then do it yourself. Relying on corporate top down hierarchies, isn’t going to get the job done. Top down hierarchies are extremely inefficient, especially when it comes to projects of passion and creativity.

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One Comment on “Fandoms (kingdoms) vs Corporate Hierarchies in lawsuits: Star Trek holders and Axanar in conflict”

  1. G6loq Says:

    ‘Homo economicus of the future: the zombie, the new man, homogenous, devoid of depth, and possessed by the spirit of unlimited universal commerce. The zombie is happy. He is told he will find happiness in satisfying his desires, because his desires generate revenue.’

    -Dominique Venner, The Shock of History
    http://www.thisblogisdangerous.com/the-shock-of-history-by-dominique-venner/


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