Learning Japanese while Immersed in Anime

I can now understand about 40% of common Japanese spoken lines in things like sitcoms, greetings, and slice of life animes. Missing mostly nouns and verbs, and grammar. The old style japanese, spoken by samurai/ninja or other nobles of 200 or more years ago, I understand almost nothing. Except the words they keep using. Even the Japanese native speakers call it “old fashioned” or “what era do you think you are in” when commenting on formats.

The written language is a tougher nut to crack. A lot of memorization will be required but once I can translate the kanji into romanji, I’ll be able to recognize a lot more words. There’s a reason why material for 20 and younger use furigana, phonetical spellings of kanji words above the kanji itself, whereas older individuals are expected to understand traditional Japanese literature as well as have a large kanji vocabulary. Primary issue is reference sources. I don’t have the keyboard to type in certain symbols, thus  there’s often some issues finding definitions of Japanese words when the only thing I have are the phonetics or the kanji (that can’t be copied and pasted).

 

 

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10 Comments on “Learning Japanese while Immersed in Anime”

  1. Michael Adams Says:

    The former pastor of my former (Knee Jerk Liberal) church was from Japan, as was his wife. They explained to me that Macs were best for writing Japanese, that one keys in a word and several homophones appear and the writer chooses the right one. If your understanding is already several light years a head of that, my apologies for wasting your time.

    BTW, I do not see an “About” page, but you now have my e-mail, in case you need to contact me. Sorry you are having trouble. I should think that Book or H (DQ) might be able to help isolate the source. I comment in open format because there’s more than one Michael Adams, even in my city, and because there is so little that anyone could do to me. I always feel for those who must be more security conscious, like Book, or Neo, or Ymarsakar.

    Delete at will.

  2. ymarsakar Says:

    Thanks for the comment. I’ll be dealing with this issue using private back channels at first, but it may be required to take it public depending on how things go.

    I’m always security conscious. That’s why they call me paranoid.

    The about page must have gone poof when I changed templates. Oh well.

  3. Michael Adams Says:

    Well, you’re not paranoid if they’re out to get you. I just don’t have the threats that some of the rest of you face. I know that my situation is different, so I have absolutely no reason to discount your, everyone’s, caution.

    Note that, as he nears retirement and can afford to be less careful, DQ, aka x, can be more open. I know some of the private identities of some of the commentators, but, until they publish them, as xxx has done, I make no reference. e.g. Imagine Sadie, living in an apartment in PA, with a bunch of old Communists, and what mishegaass she’d face if the others in the building knew her views. Y’all have your reasons. Happily, I do not.

  4. ymarsakar Says:

    If anyone wants something re-dacted that I didn’t get yet, be sure to write a comment here.

  5. suek Says:

    Using this forum since it’s inappropriate for book’s page.

    Thought you might find this interesting:

    http://www.morien-institute.org/yonaguni.html

    By the way…if you’re trying to learn Japanese…have you made use of BYKI.com?? Their basic program download is free, and their more advanced program is (or was, about 4 years ago) $75.

    My husband wanted to brush up on his arabic, and found the site very useful…

  6. ymarsakar Says:

    Thanks for the link suek, I’ll try to check that one out.

  7. suek Says:

    Here’s the other one…more useful than the first – which is just one of those amazing “what do you make of this!” sites.

    http://www.byki.com/

  8. ymarsakar Says:

    I like Atlantis stories.

    So don’t think it was wasted on me, Suek ; )


  9. The knji can be copy>pasted if you have installed Japanese fonts in your Windows/Mac OS. I don’t have this kind of problem when i am at a computer with an European keyboard. The big problem is trying to find the correct meaning of a kanji character if you don’t have an original kanji dictionary. It’s a pain. I hope that your studies are going well and that soon, we’ll be reading comments on how you understand 100% of spoken Japanese in shows and movies and are basically the man to ask for kanji definitions : )

  10. ymarsakar Says:

    I was referring to things that literally cannot be copied or pasted, like jpg images of manuals and other documents that can be viewed online. Japanese websites can be easily translated, even using machine software, but the materials I am most interested in reading are not written online so to speak.


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