How come 140 million Americans pay nothing and get to vote on everything

People thought Communism was eradicated by the end of the Cold War.

It wasn’t true. The Soviet Union went kaput, but their weapons here in the US remained viable and dangerous. Just without a controlling puppet master, they went kind of wild.

50 some odd percent of the American people [no contribution to federal tax rolls] shouldn’t be voting. But perhaps they are the ones that actually are voting, as part of the 60% turn out. It’s a rather interesting inverse scenario Athens and early America. Then the land owner class had voting power, not the landless or those requiring support.

Now instead of the Spartans running Sparta, now it is the Helots running Sparta, while the Helots are still slave farmers and the Spartans supreme land soldier-warriors.

God must have a sense of humor. Or maybe he’s working on the Grand Finale.
———————————————–
Neo has up a new post about Rhodesia. The country that Carter, Leftist useful tools, and various other international players helped make into Zimbabwe.

If you voted for Carter, welcome to the joy of actual real world consequences.

It sucks, but not as much as having to be a serf in Zimbabwe

People in the US and in other wealthier parts of the world have the luxury to play House and Dolls with the lives of others in far off places. Knocking stuff over, doing arm chair generalship, all that sounds fun to the Left and their Utopian, bullying, mentality.

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6 Comments on “How come 140 million Americans pay nothing and get to vote on everything”

  1. Alf Says:

    “It’s a rather interesting inverse scenario Athens and early America. Then the land owner class had voting power, not the landless or those requiring support.”

    Absolutely false. Ancient Athenian democracy restricted voting to free adult male citizens who had completed their military training, with no restrictions based on property. Women, children, slaves, freed slaves, and resident aliens could not vote, but any other man could.

    Every time you set your fingertips to the keyboard, you demonstrate both the depth and breadth of your ignorance.

  2. pel Says:

    > Absolutely false. Ancient Athenian democracy restricted voting to free adult male citizens …

    But not ancient Rome. The Roman Senate was comprised of landowners.

    Given the United States is a republic and not a democracy, the Roman Republic is probably the more apt comparison civilization. You could drop in Rome and change some of the tribes, and the comparison would still hold, with the point valid.

  3. ymarsakar Says:

    Every time you set your fingertips to the keyboard, you demonstrate both the depth and breadth of your ignorance.

    Are you a fan of me or something? Funny though, I don’t remember you.

  4. ymarsakar Says:

    I thought of the Roman Senate class and mentioned it elsewhere, but not particularly here.

    Women, children, slaves, freed slaves, and resident aliens could not vote, but any other man could.

    Those that can’t support themselves independently.

    So the only thing you are objecting to is that Athens doesn’t have a land owning class equivalent to the franchise.

    What, you don’t like the American republic so you want to go back to Athens? Is that somehow the issue here.

  5. ymarsakar Says:

    There’s an important aspect that isn’t mentioned here about Athens.

    Athenian Democracy is one of the more intriguing aspects of political history.

    It is a source for much of our modern conception of democracy, but it is also
    quite singular in many of its features. Athenian Democracy started developing at
    the beginning of the 6th century BC. This development began not by a revolution
    of simple people demanding political rights, but by the initiative of the ruling
    class of ancient Athens in slow evolutionary ways. By the middle of the 5th
    century BC, Athens had developed into a pure and absolute Democracy. In 594 BC,

    Solon was appointed into power. He took immediate measures to relieve the
    citizens from the burden of their debts and at the same time began an
    institutional effort to give everyday people a greater participation in city
    affairs. Solon gave right to vote to all male citizens and established a new
    council of 400 (the Boule) to replace the Ecclesia. Members of the Boule were
    chosen randomly by lot. The term Solon is now often used to describe a wise
    lawmaker. In the year 560 BC, Pisitratus seized power after Solon. He was
    thought to be in the league with the Aristocrats, but soon proved to be an even
    greater reformer than Solon. He abolished land ownership as a requirement for
    citizenship. He mandated total redistribution of the land and exiled all people
    who disagreed with him. Kleisthenes became a tyrant in 508 BC. He was an

    Aristocrat who was dedicated to Democracy. He divided Athens in to ten tribes
    based on geographical distribution and increased the Boule to 500 citizens.

    Through his reforms common citizens acquired a new sense of power with which
    they could come to expect and eventually to demand that all matters of
    significance be submitted to their Assembly for discussion and then decision.

    This opened the way for the advanced form of Democracy. The result of tyrants
    and reformers was the creation of the most democratic government in world
    history. All officials were randomly chosen by lot. The revived Ecclesia had
    full and final authority of the making and execution of laws. Juries were
    comprised of all citizens who chose to take part in the trial. In order to keep
    aristocrats from gaining control, Athenians adopted a policy of Ostracism, or
    exile, for those who would attempt to restore the Aristocracy. Although not all
    persons living in Athens had these political rights, no other Democracy in human
    history has provided such a magnificent level of participation. This political
    system, quite innovative for its times, shaped a society of a distinct
    character, of great sensibility and of unusual cultural achievements. The
    individual citizen, willing to throw himself into the political fray had an
    impressive array of powers. He could propose a law, which, if it found enough
    support, could be formulated by the Council of 500, put on the agenda of a later

    http://www.xsbusiness.com/Politics/Democracy-In-Athens.html

    The notable aspects are the dictators. There is a direct line between enforced reform leading to more representation, which then leads to mob rule, which then leads back to dictatorship.

    It doesn’t always happen. But nor is it adequate to call it historical ignorance to simply state that history is frozen in time, that Athens was this and was only ever this. This wasn’t true for Athens and it won’t be true for the US either.


  6. Now I am going away to do my breakfast, later than having
    my breakfast coming again to read additional news.


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