How to Acquire Perpetual Peace

John G. Spragge Says:
November 13th, 2008 at 6:40 am

  1. The hope that some day war will not be necessary is a laudable one—and those who fight wars hold it, too. But that day has not yet arrived—and, realistically but sadly, perhaps it never will. Let’s break that statement down a little, because it matters, a lot, that we get it right. If by making an end to war you mean eradicating the temptation to commit violence that exists in every human heart, then no, we won’t. If by making an end to war you mean eliminating it as an institution honoured and pursued by governments world wide, then yes, I think we can accomplish that.Consider the unlikely story of William Wilberforce and his small band of freed Africans, Quakers, nonconformists, and others. When they started their work, in huge area of the world you could buy a human being and get a bill of sale that the courts would recognize in just the way courts today recognize a title for a car. By the time of Wilberforce’s death, thanks to the Royal Navy, slavers had joined pirates as declared enemies of humanity, the British government would shortly eliminate slavery from a quarter of the world, and by the end of the nineteenth century, slavery as a snactioned form of property would exist only in a dwindling number of places.

    Did Wilberforce purge from the human heart the dark impulse to dominate and exploit? No, that still exists; we have to fight it at every turn, and in that sense the struggle against slavery will go on as long as humanity does. Atrocious forms of exploitation go on every day. But in no city of any civilized country can you walk into a market, buy a human being, and obtain a bill of sale that the courts will recognize and the police will enforce. That change means something.

    In the same way, we cannot eliminate the darkness from the human heart. The impulse to do violence will stay with us as long as we exist. But we can hope for a time when governments no longer have the right to let loose unlimited violence on countries they define as enemies, to a time when the weight of society, and the law, takes the side of peace the way it now takes the side of freedom.

    William Wilberforce and his allies did not take on the entrenched power of the men who bought and sold people out of mere idealism; they had a sense of what an industrial society that kept the attitudes and values behind slavery could develop into. In the same way, those of us who work towards an end to war do not respond only to the biblical injunction to make peace. We have a strong sense of where war will take our society if we do not put an end to it. The world has already lived through one nuclear war– and the fertile human mind has already dreamed up technologies with even more frightening potential than nuclear arms. We have a huge stock of terrifying weapons, and a large number of equally frightening people, those too enraged or enraptured to allow the cold calculus of deterrence to hold them back. And those who think we can keep the most dire weapons away from the terribly twisted minds that will countenance their use should consider the lesson of King Canute. Making an end to war will not guarantee our security, but if we do not put an end to war, then war will certainly put an end, if not to humanity, then at least to our civilization, and to most of us and our children.

    Ninety plus years ago, the governments of the West promised to the men suffering the misery of the trenches that this war would put an end to all wars. If we truly wish to remember and dignify the men who dies in their millions, or who came home maimed in body and spirit, we need also to remember the promise their governments made to them, and remember that ninety years on, it remains unredeemed.

  2. Ymarsakar Says:
    November 13th, 2008 at 12:54 pm Ninety plus years ago, the governments of the West promised to the men suffering the misery of the trenches that this war would put an end to all wars. If we truly wish to remember and dignify the men who dies in their millions, or who came home maimed in body and spirit, we need also to remember the promise their governments made to them, and remember that ninety years on, it remains unredeemed.John makes an interesting and original point here. He recognizes the distinction between changing institutions of law and social standards to changing basic human nature: rejecting the latter while going for the former.

    Making an end to war will not guarantee our security, but if we do not put an end to war, then war will certainly put an end, if not to humanity, then at least to our civilization, and to most of us and our children.

    So now we come down to the details where the devil must live. How do we end the institution of war or decrease the probability of war?

    It is simple. What is the probability of war between California and Georgia in the United States of America right now? It approaches the limit of 0 as to almost be impossible. What was the probability of war between Georgia and New York 50 years before the Civil War? A lot higher than almost impossible. What was the probability of war between Tennessee and West Virginia 1 month into the Civil War? That probability approaches only unity, 100%. That would be true even had West Virginia not split off at the time, because the probability of the split also approached unity as time went on.

    If we truly wish to remember and dignify the men who dies in their millions, or who came home maimed in body and spirit, we need also to remember the promise their governments made to them, and remember that ninety years on, it remains unredeemed.

    And yet, compare the results of the war between any other nation in the world in the totality of human history. How many wars have France and Russia and Germany been involved in? Did the odds of them ever warring against each other decrease or increase, to the limit of 0 or 1, as time went on from their last wars? Did the chance of war being used between Germany and France increase or decrease after the Treaty of Versailles? Did it increase or decrease after the 100 years war? The answer is simple: the percentage chance for war was always increasing to 1, to unity 100%, and then flashing into active war and then stepping down to a level below 1 and began to increase towards unity once more.

    While John has not said much concerning the details of how he intends to do what he says is a noble and worthy goal, I believe it is safe to say that John’s methods (from his previous posts here) will lead not to America’s current state but to Europe’s state after every war.

    If John truly wants to end war, he would support an American Empire more than the EU, China, Russia, or the UN combined.

    America is the only nation in the entire history of the world that has ended the possibility of war through the political changes effected through winning America’s wars. This is true whether we speak of America warring against Germany, or Japan, or the South (in the US).

    We have the record. We are the only ones to have the track record. Rome was still crucifying Jewish rebels in Hadrian’s time, which was decades after Julius Caesar conquered the Gauls. Rome was still getting into wars with the German tribes and had to constantly keep an eye on their slaves and their client tribes in Spain and Gaul. THey wouldn’t have needed to be so brutal towards the Jews for rebellion if the threat of rebellion wasn’t always a threat to them elsewhere.

    Compared to our record, Rome was a banana republic that could erupt at any time with coup de tats and internal revolts. And yet, Rome was the source of law and civilization for much of the West (and Arabic) world.

    While America has redeemed our promises to end war through fighting, no other nation has done so. Not Europe, not the EU, not the UN, not those in Africa, not China, and not Russia.

    There is only one choice for those who truly wish to see the end of warfare between groups of human beings on this planet and it is support the power and strength and reach of America across all nations, all peoples, all cultures and political identities.

    But John will refuse to do that, I suspect. THe desire for an end of war is not great enough to tolerate America in the end. And so we continue to have war.

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7 Comments on “How to Acquire Perpetual Peace”

  1. necromancer1943 Says:

    Ymarskar hello.I think I have this figured out and now have a user name and password using wordpress.com. I comment on Book’s site and you yourself have explained things to me twice now as I remember. Troubles with FF and I forget the other.

    I did have to change the user name as mike was already in use.

  2. necromancer1943 Says:

    Just checking to see if this is correct and I can log in and out when need be.Thanks

  3. Ymarsakar Says:

    Welcome to my blog, Necro.

    You mentioned that you comment on Book’s site, what is your username there?

    My blog allows anonymous comments so it doesn’t require a wordpress account. You can just type in your name and email, like I’m doing here.

    Refresh my memory will you, what troubles with FF were you referring to?

  4. Mike Says:

    I use my real name Mike on Book’s site. FF gave me fits this past week. Seems the installation was messed up somehow and had to be uninstalled and then reinstalled. Trouble happened when I deleted the saved web sites and passwords for same. I backed it all up to a CD but couldn’t figure out how to get that info back into FF. So I spent more than two days and one night setting all that up again. I still don’t have a couple of pages I need. Mostly for the VA and my meds and also the log-in info for my own site and blog. No fear there as I do know the user names and passwords.

    I really like all of what you and Book and the rest post and write about on both sites.

  5. Ymarsakar Says:

    Mozilla saves the user data in Users/YourName/appdata/Roaming/Mozilla (or Firefox)/

    It’s in a folder by some random digits and letters. Firefox may use a similar system, though I suspect the format is simpler even if the location is the same as Mozilla.

  6. Ymarsakar Says:

    The users folder is for C:/Users on Vista

    On XP, it is probably in the C/Documents and Settings folder instead.

  7. Ymarsakar Says:

    I really like all of what you and Book and the rest post and write about on both sites.

    Thanks, Mike, I too have enjoyed talking with such perceptive people as Book has around her.


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